Jugemu

寿限無 [jugemu : +1]

by GalapagosS | on Seize the day
Music: Shintarou; Lyrics: Sharaku Kobayashi
Translation by Aka
(Edited: 17/01/17)

寿限無 寿限無
五劫の擦り切れ
海砂利水魚の
水行末
雲来末 風来末
食う寝る処に住む処
パイポパイポ
パイポのシューリンガン
シューリンガンのグーリンダイ
ポンポコピーのポンポコナー
長久命の長助
jugemu   jugemu
gokou no surikire
kaijari suigyo no
suigyoumatsu
unraimatsu  fuuraimatsu
kuu neru tokoro ni sumu tokoro
PAIPO PAIPO
PAIPO no SHU-RINGAN
SHURINGAN no GU-RINDAI
PONPOKOPI- no PONPOKONA-
choukyuumei no chou suke
Long life, long life
Live for 5 eons
+2
Sand and fish in the sea +3
Limits of the waters
Limits of the clouds, of the wind
+4
A place to eat and sleep and a place to live +5
Paipo Paipo +6
Paipo’s Shuringan +7
Shuringan’s Goorindai +8
Ponpokopee’s Ponpokonah +9
Perpetual life’s long-term blessing +10

 

Edit: There is now an English Wikipedia page about Jugemu

+1 : Jugemu is a comic story that involves a child who is named at birth with every possible way to wish for his long life. The comedy comes from the constant reciting of this elongated name when the child does a bad thing in the story. The lyrics of the song is the name. It was turned into a children’s sing-a-long song for NHK Education channel.
Tbh, I’m a little confused why Sharaku is listed as writing the lyrics as this is an old traditional story-telling. I’m guessing it’s just because he arranged them to fit the song?
+2: Ikkou (一劫) is this: consider if a goddess were to come down from heaven once every 3000 years and rub a very large boulder just once. How long would it take for that boulder to be rubbed down to nothing. That is 一劫. Then times that by 5 for 五劫.
+3: The amount of fish in the sea and sand on the seafloor is the same as the child’s wellbeing.
+4: His wellbeing is endless, like the never-ending water, clouds and wind.
+5: He will always have a place a to eat, sleep and live.
Actually there is a missing line here: やぶらこうじのぶらこうじ [yabura kouji no burakouji].
+6: Paipo was a country according to some Buddhist literature.
+7: Shuringan was the king of that country.
+8: Goorindai was his queen.
+9: Ponpokopee and Ponpokonah were their two daughters.
+10: This is the assistance from these mythical people, while “suke” is a common ending to a Japanese boy’s name.

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